De continentia sacerdotum. Sub hac questione nova. Utrum Papa possit cum sacerdote dispensare ut nubat. / De co[n]tinentia sacerdotu[m]. Sub hac questione noua. Vtru[m] Papa possit cu[m] sacerdote dispensare vt nubat. Geoffroy Boussard, Wolf Traut.
Important Treatise on Sacerdotal Celibacy

De continentia sacerdotum. Sub hac questione nova. Utrum Papa possit cum sacerdote dispensare ut nubat. / De co[n]tinentia sacerdotu[m]. Sub hac questione noua. Vtru[m] Papa possit cu[m] sacerdote dispensare vt nubat.

Nürnberg (Nürmbergen): Johann Weißenburger (Joannem Weyssenburger), June 18, 1510. Woodcut on title by Wolf Traut, coloured by contemporary hand. First edition in German speaking territories, second in general (first in 1505, Paris, MarchantLaliseau). Papered spine. (32) p. a–b6, c4. Few old notes by two different hands in pen and pencil. Pages numbered in ink. Underlines in red ink. Large margins. A water-stain to lower marginal. Few stains throughout with no effect on legibility. Traces of amateur restoration to upper margin of b4. Overall in very good condition.

Rare and curious book on sacerdotal celibacy.

Geoffroy Boussard (1439–1522) was a French theologian in the College of Navarre, a chancellor of the church and University of Paris, and later the Dean of the Faculty of Theology.

His most important work is this treatise, on sacerdotal celibacy, in which he reasons that the use of marriage was universally permitted to the clergy until the pontificate of Pope Siricius (384–399) who ruled against it in “Directa Decretal” in 385, thus it is in the power of the Pope to allow the priests to marry or to decide what sort of clergymen he may allow it.

It could be assumed that the University of Paris shared the same opinion on celibacy, for Boussard formally submitted his tract to that body, and its approval is to be found in the fact that he was subsequently elevated to its chancellorship, and was deputed by the university to attend the Conciliabulum of Pisa in 1511. (Lea, 1907)

The fine woodcut on title page (depicting the Virgin and St. Anne holding Child Jesus, while two flying angels carry a brocade curtain behind the Baby) is by Wolf Traut (1486?–1520) the painter and printmaker from Nürnberg, who also worked at Albrecht Dürer’s workshop.

VD 16 B 6863; USTC 629387

[Bibl.: Lea, H. Ch.: The History of Sacerdotal Celibacy in the Christian Church. New York, Macmillan Co., 1907. pp 14–15.; Du Pin, L. E.: A new history of ecclesiastical writers. London: Swalle and Childe, 1710. pp. 359–360.]

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Price: €2,500.00

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