Item #3072 Plutarchi Chaeronei Libellus perquam elegans, De non irascendo. Eiusdem De curiositate. Uterque Latinus Des. Erasmo Rot. interprete. Adiecti sunt iidem Graeci, quo uel praelegi possint, uel certe legi à Graecanicae literaturae studiosis. Desiderius Erasmus, Plutarch.
Plutarchi Chaeronei Libellus perquam elegans, De non irascendo. Eiusdem De curiositate. Uterque Latinus Des. Erasmo Rot. interprete. Adiecti sunt iidem Graeci, quo uel praelegi possint, uel certe legi à Graecanicae literaturae studiosis.
First Edition of Erasmus’s Latin Translation of Plutarch’s De Curiositate

Plutarchi Chaeronei Libellus perquam elegans, De non irascendo. Eiusdem De curiositate. Uterque Latinus Des. Erasmo Rot. interprete. Adiecti sunt iidem Graeci, quo uel praelegi possint, uel certe legi à Graecanicae literaturae studiosis.

[Basileae (Basel)]: [apud Ioannem Frobenium], Anno M. D. XXV. [1525]. First edition. In later tooled leather. Woodcut device on title page, woodcut initials. Coll.: a4 b–k7 (k8 with woodcut device otherwise blank, missing); ff. [75]. Pages tanned. The title page, and a few tears and wormholes inside are restored, loss of letters on e8–f3 (no effect on legibility). A blue inkblot at the upper edge of the first 7 leaves. Occasional stains. Near contemporary faint underlines and notes in ink throughout. Printed marginal notes shaved. Overall in good conditio.

The first edition of Erasmus’ Latin translation of Plutarch’s De curiositate, printed together with the original Greek text. Dedicated to the Hungarian nobleman Alexius Thurzo.
De curiositate is a chapter of Plutarch’s Moralia which Erasmus, after getting familiar with the original Greek text as a proofreader of the 1509 Aldina edition, started to translate into Latin while in Cambridge in 1511. The first compilation of eight chapters in his translation was published in 1514 in Basel by Froben. The present book, besides Erasmus’ Latin translation, contains the original Greek text of De curiositate too. The book is dedicated to Alexius Thurzo (Elek Thurzó Bethlenfalvi; 1490–1543) a Hungarian nobleman, the Treasurer of the Kingdom of Hungary at the time of the publication (between 1523 and 1527), and later the Judge Royal (1527–1543). Alexius Thurzo “and two of his brothers, Johannes (I), bishop of Wroclaw, and Stanislaus, bishop of Olomouc, all became correspondents and patrons of Erasmus and of many humanists in eastern Europe. Unlike his brothers, Alexis followed a secular career in the mining business and in public office. After the death of King Louis Il of Hungary in the battle of Mohács (1526), he became an important supporter of the Hapsburg dynasty’s claims in the parts of Hungary not conquered by the Turks. Like his brothers the bishops, however, he was an active patron of humanistic learning. This dedication was offered at the urging of Jan Antonin of Košice [Joannes Antoninus Cassoviensis or János Antal Kassai; 1499–1548?/1563?], a young physician educated at Padua who had treated Erasmus for kidney stones while visiting Basel in 1524 and who after returning to Hungary and Poland promoted contact between his wealthy patrons and Erasmus.” (1572 - The Correspondence of Erasmus)
Extremely scarce Erasmus first edition. RBH records only one copy sold at auction by the Sotheby’s in 1974. USTC 684281
Literature: Erasmus D Dalzell A Nauert CG. The Correspondence of Erasmus: Letters 1535-1657 January-December 1525. Toronto Ont: University of Toronto Press; 1994. http://www.degruyter.com/doi/book/10.3138/9781442680975. Accessed October 3 2023.

Price: €3,000.00

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