Item #3137 [Diurnale Frisingense] Incipit Psalterium cu[m] suis attine[n]cijs horas diurnas concerne[n]s iuxta ritu[m] chori Ecclesie Frisingen[sis]
[Diurnale Frisingense] Incipit Psalterium cu[m] suis attine[n]cijs horas diurnas concerne[n]s iuxta ritu[m] chori Ecclesie Frisingen[sis]
[Diurnale Frisingense] Incipit Psalterium cu[m] suis attine[n]cijs horas diurnas concerne[n]s iuxta ritu[m] chori Ecclesie Frisingen[sis]
[Diurnale Frisingense] Incipit Psalterium cu[m] suis attine[n]cijs horas diurnas concerne[n]s iuxta ritu[m] chori Ecclesie Frisingen[sis]
Early and Scarce Freising Breviary

[Diurnale Frisingense] Incipit Psalterium cu[m] suis attine[n]cijs horas diurnas concerne[n]s iuxta ritu[m] chori Ecclesie Frisingen[sis]

[Augsburg]: [Erhard Ratdolt], [1507]. In burgundy morocco by Pierre-Marcellin Lortic. Panels with tooled double-frame, with the stamp of Charles II, Duke of Parma in the corners, his coat-of-arms in the center, and an allegorical genealogical tree on the rear panel. Spine with raised bands, compartments with gilt title, publisher and date, and the stamp of Charles II. Gilt turn-ins, marbled endpapers, gilt edges. Charles II’s bookplate from his Liturgical Library on the inner front panel. Shelfmark vignette on inner rear panel. Printed in red and black throughout. With two large woodcuts on the first and the last leaves, the first, hand colored, with the crest of the Archdiocese of Freising and the coat of arms of the Bavarian House of Wittelsbach held by an angel, the last is the printer’s device printed in red and black. Several woodcut initials. ff. [1] 67–72 XXIII XXII XIX XVIII [1] 87–89 (88 unnumbered) [1] [3 (blank)] I–XXVII (ff. XIII–XV foliated in reverse order) 28–72 (misfoliated: 29 as 28; 31 as XXX; 32. Probably washed. In fine condition.

Scarce and early-printed German breviary for the use of Freising in Bavaria.

Freising is one of the oldest bishoprics in Bavaria, Germany, dating back to the eight century. Throughout the centuries the city developed its own liturgy, which by the sixteenth century became significantly different not only from those of other church provinces but also from those of the other dioceses within the Bavarian province. This difference is reflected in the prescriptions of Freising’s liturgical books, among which the present one is the second to be published after the 1482–1483 Breviarium Frisingense (Bamberg, Sensenschmidt-Petzensteiner). (Crook 2014)

Extremely scarce, we could trace copies only in German libraries (BSB and Universitätsbibliothek Eichstätt-Ingolstadt), USTC distinguishes two variants and lists five copies of which three digitalized and none of them are identical to each other, nor to our copy. One of them contains partly different text (BSB Res/Liturg. 294-2), and the other two differ in foliation (the last page of Pars hyemalis [mis]foliated either 120 [BSM Res/Liturg. 294a] or 130 [BSM Res/Liturg. 294-1]). Our copy is resembles the most to Res/Liturg. 294a, however, the last section (Incipit commune sanctorum) follows a different order and collation.

Provenance: Charles II, Duke of Parma (1799-1883) owned a library of around 5,500 works, two-thirds of which were works of liturgy or religious history. This work is number 78 of its sale which took place from May 30 to June 1, 1932. Reference: USTC 668139/668140; VD B 8141/8142

Literature: Crook, D. (1994). Orlando di Lasso’s Imitation Magnificats for Counter-rReformation Munich. Princeton University Press. February 1 2024. pp. 38–41.

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Price: €8,000.00

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