Item #2677 The Public Laws of the State of South-Carolina, from its first establishment as a British province down to the year 1790, inclusive, in which is comprehended such of the Statutes of Great Britain as were made of force by the Act of Assembly of 1712, with an Appendix containing such other Statutes as have been enacted or declared to be of force in this State, either virtually or expressly, to which is added the Titles of all the Laws (with their respective dates) which have been passed in South-Carolina down to the present time, also the Constitution of the United States with the amendments thereto, and likewise the newly adopted Constitution of the State of South-Carolina, together with a copious index to the whole. By the Honorable John Faucheraud Grimké, Esq. A.B. & L.L.D. and one of the associate Judges of the Superior Courts in the state of South-Carolina. Minera Servitus est, ubi Jus est Vagum aut Incognitum. 4 Inst. 246,332. John Faucheraud Grimké, John Julius Pringle.
The Public Laws of the State of South-Carolina, from its first establishment as a British province down to the year 1790, inclusive, in which is comprehended such of the Statutes of Great Britain as were made of force by the Act of Assembly of 1712, with an Appendix containing such other Statutes as have been enacted or declared to be of force in this State, either virtually or expressly, to which is added the Titles of all the Laws (with their respective dates) which have been passed in South-Carolina down to the present time, also the Constitution of the United States with the amendments thereto, and likewise the newly adopted Constitution of the State of South-Carolina, together with a copious index to the whole. By the Honorable John Faucheraud Grimké, Esq. A.B. & L.L.D. and one of the associate Judges of the Superior Courts in the state of South-Carolina. Minera Servitus est, ubi Jus est Vagum aut Incognitum. 4 Inst. 246,332.
The Public Laws of the State of South-Carolina, from its first establishment as a British province down to the year 1790, inclusive, in which is comprehended such of the Statutes of Great Britain as were made of force by the Act of Assembly of 1712, with an Appendix containing such other Statutes as have been enacted or declared to be of force in this State, either virtually or expressly, to which is added the Titles of all the Laws (with their respective dates) which have been passed in South-Carolina down to the present time, also the Constitution of the United States with the amendments thereto, and likewise the newly adopted Constitution of the State of South-Carolina, together with a copious index to the whole. By the Honorable John Faucheraud Grimké, Esq. A.B. & L.L.D. and one of the associate Judges of the Superior Courts in the state of South-Carolina. Minera Servitus est, ubi Jus est Vagum aut Incognitum. 4 Inst. 246,332.
The Public Laws of the State of South-Carolina, from its first establishment as a British province down to the year 1790, inclusive, in which is comprehended such of the Statutes of Great Britain as were made of force by the Act of Assembly of 1712, with an Appendix containing such other Statutes as have been enacted or declared to be of force in this State, either virtually or expressly, to which is added the Titles of all the Laws (with their respective dates) which have been passed in South-Carolina down to the present time, also the Constitution of the United States with the amendments thereto, and likewise the newly adopted Constitution of the State of South-Carolina, together with a copious index to the whole. By the Honorable John Faucheraud Grimké, Esq. A.B. & L.L.D. and one of the associate Judges of the Superior Courts in the state of South-Carolina. Minera Servitus est, ubi Jus est Vagum aut Incognitum. 4 Inst. 246,332.
Scarce, Early Collection of South Carolina Laws; Notable Provenance

The Public Laws of the State of South-Carolina, from its first establishment as a British province down to the year 1790, inclusive, in which is comprehended such of the Statutes of Great Britain as were made of force by the Act of Assembly of 1712, with an Appendix containing such other Statutes as have been enacted or declared to be of force in this State, either virtually or expressly, to which is added the Titles of all the Laws (with their respective dates) which have been passed in South-Carolina down to the present time, also the Constitution of the United States with the amendments thereto, and likewise the newly adopted Constitution of the State of South-Carolina, together with a copious index to the whole. By the Honorable John Faucheraud Grimké, Esq. A.B. & L.L.D. and one of the associate Judges of the Superior Courts in the state of South-Carolina. Minera Servitus est, ubi Jus est Vagum aut Incognitum. 4 Inst. 246,332.

Philadelphia: Printed by R. Aitken & Son, in Market Street, M.DCC.XC. [1790]. First edition. In contemporary calf. Spine with raised bands and red morocco title vignette. John Julius Pringle’s possessor’s inscription on the title page, within “Dedication”, last leaf, and rear panel. lxxvii, [1], 504, 43, [1 (blank)] [58] p. Signatures: pi² A–L² M1 N–R² S1 ²S² T1; B⁴ C–6L² a-2b² 2c1. Spine artistically restored, endpapers probably renewed utilizing old paper. Panels rubbed, spotted with inkblots and doodles. Corners slightly bumped. Pages toned due to aging, sporadic foxing, few inkblots. Contemporary marginal notes and underlines occasionally. Some pages dogeared, chipped. Upper corner of p. 353 torn with missing, not affecting the text. P. 357 with closed tear, no effect on legibility. Lower margin on oo2 (in “Index”) torn with missing, not affecting the text. Overall in very good condition.

First edition of this scarce and early collection of South Carolina colonial and state laws, one of the earliest prints of the 1790 Constitution of South Carolina, also contains the U. S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights. With notable provenance. An important and relatively early compendium of laws and statutes from South Carolina’s colonial period to the inception of the federal government (1694–1790). The full Constitution of the United States is printed in the Appendix (pp. 29–36), with the addition of the twelve proposed amendments comprising the Bill of Rights as ratified by South Carolina in January 1790. (In 1791, only ten of the twelve amendments were declared ratified by Congress). The Constitution of the State of South Carolina, adopted on 3 June 1790, is also included in the Appendix (pp. 37–43.), which is one of its first appearances in print.

Compiled by John Faucheraud Grimké (1752–1819) a Charleston jurist. Grimké “attended Princeton University and later studied law at Trinity College at the University of Oxford in England. At the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, Grimké returned to America to take up arms against the British. He fought in many decisive battles during the war including the battles of Eutaw Springs and Yorktown. He ultimately rose to the rank of colonel. In the post-war years, Grimké focused on building his law practice and bolstering his family’s wealth through investments and the acquisition of real estate. In 1782, he entered politics as a representative of St. Philip’s and St. Michael’s parishes in the South Carolina State Legislature, a position he held until 1790. In his time with the legislature, Grimké served as Speaker of the House from 1785–1786 and was a member of the South Carolina Constitutional Convention in 1788.” (Schulz, 2020)

The present copy belonged to John Julius Pringle, Attorney General of South Carolina. Pringle (1753–1843) was born in Charleston, commenced the study of law in the office of John Rutledge in 1772, and continued in England. In 1778–1779 acted as secretary to Ralph Izard in France. Returned to Charleston in 1781, practiced law, and became Speaker of the South Carolina House of Representatives. Many of the laws presented in this compilation were signed by him in this capacity (pp. 414–467). From 1789 to 1792 served as Federal District Attorney, and in 1789, he was appointed by George Washington, Attorney General of South Carolina (The Papers of George Washington), which office he held for sixteen years. In June 1805, he was offered by President Jefferson the post of Attorney General of the United States, which he declined, preferring to remain in his native state. During his practice, he made important contributions to the principles of South Carolina jurisprudence. He participated in compiling the convention in 1788, that ratified the Constitution of the United States and the convention that drew up the state constitution of 1790. (Prabook)

Provenance: John Julius Pringle Sr. (1753–1843), Attorney General of South Carolina.

Sabin 87706, Evans 22897 Literature: Schultz, Rebecca. “John Faucheraud Grimké, 1752-1819.” City of Charleston Records Management. 24 June 2020. https://www.charleston-sc.gov/2354/Intendants-and-Mayors; [The Papers of George Washington]: “From George Washington to the United States Senate, 24 September 1789,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/05-04-02-0053. [Original source: The Papers of George Washington, Presidential Series, vol. 4, 8 September 1789 – 15 January 1790, ed. Dorothy Twohig. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1993, pp. 75–80.]; [Prabook]: “John Julius Pringle”. Retrieved from: https://prabook.com/web/john.pringle/3764013.

Price: €32,000.00

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