Bylismy w Oswiecimiu. 6643 Janusz Nel Siedlecki, 75817 Krysytn Olszewski, 119198 Tadeusz Borowski. [We Were In Auschwitz. 6643 Janusz Nel Siedlecki, 75817 Krysytn Olszewski, 119198 Tadeusz Borowski.]. Tadeusz Borowski, Janusz Nel Siedlecki, Krystyn Olszewski, Anatol Girs.
Bylismy w Oswiecimiu. 6643 Janusz Nel Siedlecki, 75817 Krysytn Olszewski, 119198 Tadeusz Borowski. [We Were In Auschwitz. 6643 Janusz Nel Siedlecki, 75817 Krysytn Olszewski, 119198 Tadeusz Borowski.]
Early Auschwitz Memoirs

Bylismy w Oswiecimiu. 6643 Janusz Nel Siedlecki, 75817 Krysytn Olszewski, 119198 Tadeusz Borowski. [We Were In Auschwitz. 6643 Janusz Nel Siedlecki, 75817 Krysytn Olszewski, 119198 Tadeusz Borowski.]

[Munich]: Oficyna Warszawska na Obczyznie, 1946. First edition. Numbered copy. In publisher’s illustrated cardboard. 212, (4) p. In fine condition.

First edition of this accurate description of Auschwitz and other concentration camps and the brutality of daily life by three former Polish political prisoners. Dedicated to the U.S. Seventh Army, the liberator of the Dachau-Allach concentration camp. On the title page the names of the authors are preceded by their prisoner numbers.

The idea of the book came from Anatol Girs, the preeminent Polish graphic artist and publisher, who has been deported to Auschwitz during the Warsaw Uprising and he was liberated in Allach. He owned the publisher “Oficyna Warszawska na Obczyzniein” in Munich, and this book was its third postwar publication. The evocative cover design, the prison-uniform stripes with the prison-badge of red triangle and number, which was the the sign of the political prisoner in the camps, was designed by Girs and he is also responsible for the foreword of the book. Girs became a father figure and mentor of the authors and according to Borowski’s wife’s he “had an enormous moral and intellectual influence on Borowski".

Tadeusz Borowski (1922–1951) was a Polish writer and journalist. He was involved in the underground organizations during WWII in the occupied Poland and in 1943 he was deported to Auschwitz. After the war he worked for the Communist party as a journalist and he published his stories about the concentration camps. Borowski committed suicide at the age of 28 because of his disillusionment of the Communist regime in Poland.

An early and important account about the concentration camps of WWII.

[Ref.: Drewnowski, T. (ed.): Postal Indiscretion. The Correspondence of Tadeusz Borowksi. Northwestern University Press, 2007.]

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Price: €400.00